Tag Archives: Computerworld Mobile & Wireless

64% off Anker Astro E1 Ultra Compact High Speed Portable Charger – Deal Alert

This inexpensive smartphone charger from Anker is the size of a candy bar, and has enough juice to recharge any smartphone, including the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, at least 1-2 times over. It’s discounted 64% to just $18. The Astro E1 currently averages 4.5 out of 5 stars from over 8,200 people on Amazon (81% rate 5 stars: See reviews), and it’s listed there as a #1 best-seller. See the attractively priced Anker Astro E1 charger now on Amazon.

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30% off Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader – Deal Alert

While the high-speed Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader supports the latest high-speed CF and SD formats, it’s also backwards compatible with standard CF and SD cards, as well as USB 2.0. The Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader has the ability to read from both card slots simultaneously, and it also allows for easy file transfer from one card to another. Leverages SuperSpeed USB 3.0 technology for high-speed file transfers, with USB interface speed up to 500MB/s. The reader averages 4.5 out of 5 stars from over 770 people on Amazon (read reviews), where the typical list price has been reduced 30% to just $24.45. See this deal on Amazon.

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The 5 surprising things to know about smart glasses

The world’s largest long-haul airline wants both employees and customers using smart glasses.

Emirates Airlines, based in Dubai, revealed this week that the company sees smart glasses as a strategic initiative that should help them fend off discount airline rivals.

Airlines succeed when they can treat passengers with a personal touch and top-notch customer service. For example, flight attendants can call passengers by name, provide personalized meals (that are, say, vegetarian or kosher), give extra attention to nervous fliers, provide added service for loyalty-card members or keep an eye on passengers with a history of disruptiveness.

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Apple is ‘pervasive in the enterprise,’ says IBM

While there remain some industry observers that cling to rapidly diminishing arguments against such deployment, “Apple devices are already pervasive in the enterprise,” Mahmoud Naghshineh, General Manager, Offerings and Solutions, IBM, told me.

The iOS enterprise is here

Naghshineh was spoke to me as IBM expands its MobileFirst iOS for the enterprise scheme. He echoes Mike Brinker, Global Digital Leader, Deloitte Digital, who last year called Apple’s products “essential to the modern enterprise”.

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With iOS 11, Apple focuses on enterprise users

Last week, Apple made it clear that it intends for iOS to remain the dominant mobile platform for the enterprise. iOS 11, which will be released as a public beta later this month and is due out in final form this fall, doubles down on productivity, offers a more intuitive UI, and ensures that the iPad Pro can actually replace a PC for the vast majority of worker tasks.
 
The most notable iOS 11 features for business use are, not surprisingly tied to the iPad Pro, which in the past has been useful for certain tasks — especially for designers and for word processing — but often didn’t meet the bar to serve as a true PC alternative. 
 
The biggest issue with the iPad has always stemmed from its inception as a mobile device. When Apple’s tablet arrived seven years ago, there was a lot of dismissive talk that it was really nothing more than a larger iPhone or iPod Touch. It didn’t help that Apple initially positioned the iPad as a consumer device, one for viewing content rather than creating it. Despite Apple’s efforts to make iOS devices true enterprise citizens — and it’s had a fair amount of success doing so — the belief persists that the iPad isn’t a PC (or Mac) and therefore is a secondary device rather than a primary computing solution.

Mobile first set Apple’s direction

Within that debate, there’s a nugget of truth. iOS is, and always has been, a mobile OS. It was originally designed for a phone, where the capabilities needed for business  are rather different. We don’t expect to do 3D modeling or write long documents or presentations on a phone, despite its processing power and today’s larger form factors. Apple also made an effort to ensure continuity of user experience across all iOS devices, which includes devices with displays ranging from four inches to almost 13. 
 
Apple has been largely successful in doing that. But trying to keep a single user experience across those form factors and use cases had the effect of hobbling how users, particularly business users, could be productive on the iPad. iOS 11 breaks that tradition by delivering a much more capable, even somewhat desktop-like, user interface on the iPad compared to the iPhone. From what we’ve seen so far, Apple managed this without truly disrupting the relation between the iPad and iPhone. 
 
Apple’s decision to deliver a more unique experience on the iPad this year also had a side effect. Many of the newly unveiled interface elements in iOS 11 on the iPad take design cues from macOS. Drag and drop, the on-screen Dock, the Files app, the ability to have multiple paired apps and slide between them, all are strongly reminiscent of their desktop counterparts.
 
In making the iPad more capable, it’s becoming more Mac-like. If you put Apple’s product lines side by side, there is now a very effective and obvious progression of user interface from desktop to tablet to phone to watch. This gives all of Apple’s products a greater sense of cohesion. And it strengthens Apple’s ecosystem because one device leads so naturally to the next. That’s even clearer when you consider services like the Continuity features Apple released two years ago, or even the ease of setup for products like the Apple Watch and AirPods.
surface book surface pro 4 Microsoft Microsoft

Microsoft’s Surface Pro 4 and Surface Book.

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Google’s Pixel ‘sales numbers’ don’t tell the whole story

People love numbers.

I get it: There’s something satisfying about being able to quantify a concept — to define it in numerical terms that tell us unequivocally what it’s all about.

The problem is that in many cases, numbers don’t actually tell the whole story. Sometimes, in fact, they can even cloud what’s really important.

We see this sort of thing happen in tech all the time. For years, everyone loved to focus on a phone’s specs — how many pixels its screen contained, what level of processor it relied on for its computing power, and so on. But then we reached a point where, for most practical purposes, all of that stuff kinda became irrelevant. Pretty much every modern mobile device from midrange on up is fast. All the displays look stunning. The numbers alone just don’t mean much anymore; what matters most is the real-world user experience — something that can’t be quantified.

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Apple’s profound iPhone plans for healthcare

A report today once again confirms Apple is interested in making your iPhone the center of your electronic health records (EHR) data. What’s going on, and why does this matter?

Take a Gliimpse

Apple last year acquired Gliimpse, an electronic health records development company. When news of the purchase broke, I suggested this marked the company’s interest in developing its own EHR systems, and this has been confirmed by CNBC.

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Rogue cell phone surveillance gives rise to mobile threat defense

Researchers have created a device using off-the-shelf components that can sniff out controversial cell phone surveillance devices, known as IMSI-catchers or StingRays, used by federal and state law enforcement as well as hackers.

The International Mobile Subscriber Identity-catchers have not only been used to locate mobile devices but also to sometimes eavesdrop on users, send spam or upload malware, according to University of Washington (UW) security researchers.

“The threats remain the same when looking at enterprises: tracking and, under certain circumstances, eavesdropping are possible through this attack,” said Dionisio Zumerle, a Gartner research director for Mobile Security. “The attack requires technical expertise and equipment that was once hard to find; today it is easier and that is the main source of concern.”

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61% off Jackery Bolt 6,000mAh Power Bank with Built-in Lightning and Micro USB Cables – Deal Alert

Reduce some of that cable clutter with the ultra compact Jackery Bolt 6,000mAh external battery charger that features a built-in Apple Lighting cable for your iPhone or iPad and a built-in micro-USB cable for other mobile devices. With an additional open USB port you can charge up to 3 devices at once. Powerful 6000 mAh capacity can fully charge an iPhone 6 at up to 3 times.  The Jackery Bolt averages 4.5 out of 5 stars from over 240 people on Amazon (read reviews), where its list price of $69.99 has been reduced 63% down to just $26.99. See the discounted external power bank now on Amazon

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The new dock on an iPad is the first sign of the Mac apocalypse

I started using a Mac for the first time at a corporate job in the 1990s.

I still remember starting up Photoshop for the first time and being amazed at how much editing I could do on a color photo, and then doing some basic page layout in a long-forgotten app called Aldus PageMaker.

These were the days when there was still a sense of wonder about being able to load multiple apps at once, and even the classic mouse was still fairly new, at least in terms of doing professional graphic design work with some accuracy.

Recently, Apple announced they would be adding a few features to the iPad that, when I first heard about them, instantly wondered if this was going to be the end of the Mac for good. I know, processing power on mobile devices is still not quite there yet. You can’t quite fit a high-end NVIDIA card into an iPad. Yet, from a workflow standpoint, several features in iOS 11 stand out as noteworthy, but they are also a sign that the Mac might be heading for extinction.

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