Category Archives: cloud

Developers race to support iOS 11 and its Files app

It looks like developers were just waiting for Apple to introduce the Files app in iOS 11. Within hours of the introduction of the feature, we’ve seen multiple developers introduce Files support, and it seems abundantly clear the app is going to transform how people approach iOS productivity.

What is Apple’s Files app?

Files is Apple’s approach to real file storage, edit and retrieval on iOS. It is an app in which you can access every item you hold in online storage services.

The idea is that you can work on something on your iPhone, edit it on your iPad, and finish up on your Mac, PC or other device. Edits made inside an item in Files or one of the file services it hosts are automatically synced to all the other systems you have that use that service.

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Developers are racing to support iOS 11 and its Files app

It looks like developers were just waiting for Apple to introduce the Files app in iOS 11. Within just hours of the introduction of the feature we’ve seen multiple developers introduce Files support and it seems abundantly clear the app is going to transform how people approach iOS productivity.

Wax lyrical

Files is Apple’s approach to real file storage, edit and retrieval on iOS. It is an app in which you can access every item you hold in online storage services.

The idea is that you can work on something on your iPhone, edit it on your iPad, and finish up on your Mac, PC or other device. Edits made inside an item in Files or one of the file services it hosts are automatically synced to all the other systems you have that use that service.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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Review: 4 online backup services keep your data safe

In the 15 years that I’ve been running a small company, I have survived several malware attacks. The only thing that kept me in business was a reliable backup of my data.

When it comes to my data (if not my pants), I’m a belt and suspenders kind of person: In addition to periodically copying my two key work folders onto an external hard drive, my system automatically backs up my computer’s contents to an encrypted cloud-based backup service at 1 o’clock every morning.

If I’m attacked or my main computer goes south, I won’t lose my company’s 40.9GB of data, even if some catastrophe destroys both the computer and the external hard drive. More than once, I have used the backups to save my digital bacon by retrieving a deleted file, and the online backup has the added convenience of letting me use just about any connected device to access a document and show it to a client during a remote meeting.

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IDG Contributor Network: Challenges in realizing the promises of the holistic edge

Cloud providers such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are already rolling out distributed cloud infrastructure. Whilst the central cloud is established as an integral part of current and future networks, there are key issues that make the central cloud simply not the solution to several use cases.

  • Latency, also known as the Laws of Physics: The longer the distance is between two communicating entities, the longer the time it takes to move content there. Whilst the delay of reaching out to the cloud today might be tolerable for some applications, it will not be the case for emerging applications that will require nearly instantaneous responses (e.g. in industrial IoT control, robots, machines, autonomous cars, drones, etc.).
  • Data volume: The capacity of communication networks will simply not scale with the insane amount of raw data that is anticipated will need ferrying to and from a remote cloud center.
  • Running costs: The cost of a truly massive computational and storage load in the cloud will simply not be economically sustainable over the longer term.
  • Regulatory: There are and will very likely be new constraints (privacy, security, sovereignty, etc.) which will impose restrictions on what data may or may not be transferred and processed in the cloud.

So it certainly does make sense to distribute the cloud and interconnect this distributed infrastructure together with the central cloud. This process has already begun. One good tangible example is Amazon’s launch of the AWS GreenGrass (AWS for the Edge) product and their declared intentions to use their Whole Foods Stores (in addition to the small matter of selling groceries) as locations for future edge clouds/data centers. In general, cloud providers, perhaps driven by their real estate choices, have a relatively conservative view of the edge, restricting it to a point of presence typically 10 to 50 km from the consumer.

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IDG Contributor Network: Challenges in realizing the promises of the holistic edge

Cloud providers such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are already rolling out distributed cloud infrastructure. Whilst the central cloud is established as an integral part of current and future networks, there are key issues that make the central cloud simply not the solution to several use cases.

  • Latency, also known as the Laws of Physics: The longer the distance is between two communicating entities, the longer the time it takes to move content there. Whilst the delay of reaching out to the cloud today might be tolerable for some applications, it will not be the case for emerging applications that will require nearly instantaneous responses (e.g. in industrial IoT control, robots, machines, autonomous cars, drones, etc.).
  • Data volume: The capacity of communication networks will simply not scale with the insane amount of raw data that is anticipated will need ferrying to and from a remote cloud center.
  • Running costs: The cost of a truly massive computational and storage load in the cloud will simply not be economically sustainable over the longer term.
  • Regulatory: There are and will very likely be new constraints (privacy, security, sovereignty, etc.) which will impose restrictions on what data may or may not be transferred and processed in the cloud.

So it certainly does make sense to distribute the cloud and interconnect this distributed infrastructure together with the central cloud. This process has already begun. One good tangible example is Amazon’s launch of the AWS GreenGrass (AWS for the Edge) product and their declared intentions to use their Whole Foods Stores (in addition to the small matter of selling groceries) as locations for future edge clouds/data centers. In general, cloud providers, perhaps driven by their real estate choices, have a relatively conservative view of the edge, restricting it to a point of presence typically 10 to 50 km from the consumer.

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iCloud security: How (and why) to enable two-factor authentication

Given that so many of the details of our digital lives are either with us (on our smartphones) or easily accessible (via the web), you should be doing everything you can to protect that information and data. On iPhones and iPads, data is largely kept in a vault, sealed behind strong encryption and (hopefully) a strong password. Even if the device is lost or stolen, chances are good that encryption will keep data safe. (That vault is secure enough to frustrate even the FBI.)

Although iOS devices are designed and built to be secure, data is also stored and accessible online. With security breaches occurring routinely, your data is vulnerable to anyone in the world with an internet connection and a halfway decent browser. If a breach occurs and thieves gain access to your email and password, they can easily reset any account linked to that email, change the password, and lock you out of your own data.

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IDG Contributor Network: SIP trunks are more reliable than a PRI T1

Are SIP trunks as reliable as an ISDN PRI T1?

I’m asked this question a lot, so I thought it’d be a great blog topic.

I don’t think you are as concerned with this as the amber lights in the server room… But if you are making any changes to your company’s phone system, I’m assuming this question is on your mind.

The simple answer is… no. SIP trunks are not as reliable. They are more reliable than a Primary Rate Interface (PRI). But it has nothing to do with the public Internet.

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Apple embraces a multi-cloud future, and that’s exciting

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