Category Archives: cloud

Digital is the new shiny spoon: Danielle Di Masi Digital is the new shiny spoon: Danielle Di Masi

CIO India’s Yogesh Gupta talks with Danielle Di Masi, Digital communications & marketing strategist, about digital adoption and human and technology balance.

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RStudio cloud service in the works?

An interesting result popped up when I searched for RStudio cloud this morning: RStudio.cloud from RStudio itself.

“Kick the tires to your hearts delight – but don’t plan on taking a cross-country trip just yet,” the service warns on its home page.

I logged in using my existing shinyapps.io account, which the home page advises to do. If  you don’t use shinyapps.io, you can set up a new account there, or use Google or GitHub credentials. 

The opening screen lets you create a project:

RStudio.coud Screenshot at RStudio.cloud

Page to create a project at RStudio.cloud.

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Google Pixelbook: What the naysayers are missing

The reviews are in for Google’s $999 Pixelbook — and the overwhelming results? Well, they aren’t exactly surprising.

Let me sum up the common conclusion for you, in a nutshell: The Pixelbook is a beautiful, spectacular, and incredibly well-built device. In fact, it’s one of the most impressive computers we’ve ever seen! But, oh: It runs Chrome OS, so you absolutely shouldn’t spend a thousand dollars on it.

Those opinions were practically set in stone the second the Pixelbook was announced — or maybe even earlier. Heck, you can see the same sentiments being expressed in articles posted just hours after Google’s early-October event:

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Reality check: Can you use a Chromebook for work?

“Sure, Chromebooks are fine for schools and other simple stuff, but you can’t actually use ’em for work — can you?”

As someone who’s written about Google’s Chrome OS platform since the start, that’s a question I’ve heard more times than I can count. So I set out to get some current perspective on the answer.

For context, Chromebooks have actually played a significant role in my personal life for years. While I use a Windows desktop system in my office during the workday, I rely on a Chromebook for pretty much anything else that isn’t well suited to a phone — after-hours typing, weekend bill-paying, light work away from my desk, and so on. I’ve taken Chromebooks with me to handle work while I travel, too, but it’s been a while — and boy, oh boy, has a lot changed.

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Jamf, Microsoft confirm Apple grows in the enterprise

Jamf Nation Conference (#JNUC) has become one of the more important events in the Apple in the enterprise diary, and Microsoft appeared at the event to show new integration that enables Apple’s solutions to work even effectively with Azure cloud services. 

Hell freezes over 

Microsoft’s Brad Anderson, corporate vice president, demonstrated how Microsoft Enterprise Mobility + Security (EMS) tools will soon work with Jamf integration and Apple’s platforms to ensure that enterprise Macs are security compliant with Azure AD authentication.

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Don’t be the fool in the cloud

When I hear people worrying about cloud security, they’re usually shaking in their boots about some obscure bug beyond their control. Ha! Ordinary, stupid human mistakes are more than bad enough.

For example, Accenture left hundreds of gigabytes of private user and corporate data on four unsecured Amazon Web Services (AWS) S3 cloud servers. The data included passwords and decryption keys. What did you need to dig into this treasure trove? The servers’ web addresses.

That’s all. No user ID, no password, no nothing.

Adding insult to injury, according to Chris Vickery, director of cyber-risk research at security firm UpGuard, Accenture’s revealed data included its AWS Key Management System (KMS) master keys. With those, an attacker could have also taken control of all the company’s encrypted AWS data.

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4 crazy Chromebooks myths, debunked

Bring up Chromebooks in any online crowd, and you’re practically guaranteed to get some version of a now-stock reaction:

Pshaw! Why would anyone pay for a browser in a box?

Or maybe:

Harrumph! Isn’t Google about to get rid of those and make the whole thing a part of Android, anyway?

Or the time-tested standby:

Pish tosh! You can’t do anything on those. Get a real computer instead. (Pshaw!)

These are the sorts of misguided statements sentient creatures have been making since the earliest days of Google’s Chrome OS platform (y’know, way back in the early 1700s, when I first started writing about this stuff). A lot has changed since the Chromebook’s debut — both with the software itself and with the way we hominids use technology in general — but the stubborn old inaccurate assessments remain.

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