Category Archives: emerging technologies

Why we’re getting self-driving delivery before self-driving Ubers

Self-driving cars and trucks are everywhere, it seems. Especially in the news.

We were inundated this week with media reports about huge progress on the autonomous vehicle front.

The press reported that Google — I mean Waymo — ordered “thousands” of minivans to build a fleet of autonomous vehicles that will ferry members of Waymo’s “early rider program.” The company — Alphabet’s self-driving car startup that used to be part of Google — is already ferrying passengers around a small neighborhood in Phoenix — and with no drivers in the cars. Self-driving cars are also carrying passengers in Boston, Pittsburgh and elsewhere.

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Meet ‘Sawtooth,’ a new modular platform for building enterprise blockchains

The Linux Foundation’s open-source blockchain collaborative, Hyperledger, has unveiled Sawtooth 1.0, a modular framework for building, deploying and running business blockchains.

Blockchain proof-of-concept pilots based on Sawtooth 1.0 have already been deployed to support multiple business cases, including music and media content rights attribution, healthcare transaction recordings, Know Your Customer (KYC) in financial services and others, according to Hyperledger.

Hyperledger Sawtooth is the foundation’s second Hyperledger project to go live after Fabric 1.0 in July 2017. Fabric enables blockchain components, such as consensus and membership services.

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Tech Talk: What’s trending for 2018?

When it comes to tech trends we’re likely to see in 2018, nothing would likely be more welcome than the end of passwords. With companies looking for ever better ways to protect data, it seems clear that “password123” has no indefinite future. (Nor does you pet’s name, if that’s what you use.)

But just how quickly passwords will be shunted aside, and by what technology – biometrics? two-factor authentication? algorithms? – remains unclear.

That was topic No. 1 for our panel of tech experts – CSO‘s Michael Nadeau, Infoworld‘s Serdar Syegulalp, Computerworld Executive Editor Ken Mingis and  Macworld‘s Michael Simon – as they peer into the near-future to discern what’s coming in 2018 and what’s not.

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Spending on blockchain technology to double this year to $2.1B

Spending by enterprises and other entities on blockchain networks is expected to reach $2.1 billion this year, more than double what was spent on the distributed electronic ledger technology in 2017.

The U.S. will lead the world in blockchain investments, accounting for 40% of spending, followed by Western Europe, China and the Asia Pacific region (not including Japan), according to a new report from IDC.

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Mingis on Tech: 2018 and the Blockchain bubble

If 2017 was the year blockchain swept the tech industry with the potential to disrupt a variety of verticals — FinTech, healthcare and shipping – 2018 is already shaping up to be the breakout year for the distributed ledger technology.

Case in point: Maersk and IBM announced earlier this month that they’ve joined forces to create a new company focused on building a blockchain-based electronic shipping platform. According to Maersk, the platform would effectively supplant an archaic system that now relies on legacy technology, and paper, to track shipments around the world – something that could save billions of dollars.

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Blockchain and cryptocurrency may soon underpin cloud storage

Through blockchain, Roberto Galoppini sees an opportunity to kill two birds with one stone: His organization, FileZilla, can offer users free online data storage while also allowing them to earn valuable cryptocurrency.

Galoppini, director of strategy for FileZilla, the popular, open-source FTP client, said his service is planning to shift direction this year by using a peer-to-peer (P2P), distributed storage platform from Atlanta-based Storj Labs Inc. that will be managed via blockchain.

FileZilla, which has been piloting the Storj decentralized storage for several months, had been making money through its free file-sharing service, which is hosted on SourceForge.net. It pitches users third-party software or offers to let them make money by testing a new web or mobile application. In turn, FileZilla would share revenue with the third-party software vendors.

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IDG Contributor Network: Marketers should enter auto infotainment quickly and carefully

At CES 2018, cutting-edge marketers are starting to see the automobile infotainment system as their newest playground. How they can use wireless technology to deliver advertising messages to a captive audience. However, I want to warn that this new revolution is a double-edged sword. Companies must enter this space, but if they don’t do so correctly, they will hurt themselves.

In-car infotainment systems are an exciting new rapidly growing area. However, advertising, marketing and brand building messages must be carefully thought through and delivered. You must start carefully. It must not be intrusive. Remember, this has traditionally been a private space for the user and many of them will push-back if not done correctly.

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How AR and VR will change enterprise mobility

Two of the hottest technologies today — augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) — are likely to have a big impact on enterprise mobility strategies, according to industry experts. Not for a couple of years, it’s true. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be prepared to deal with them as part of your enterprise mobility management (EMM). The funny thing about our ever-accelerating technology advances is that things that were only emerging one day are suddenly everyday business tools the next — and you have to manage them.

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